Contents

This article describes the lessons that exist in being injured or ill. It also talks about how we can go a long way towards injury and illness prevention just buy doing some simple and enjoyable activities everyday

A Lesson From Rooney

A Lesson From RooneyCopyright 2006 Robert RylesIt has become 'The Rooney Metatarsal'. The good old metatarsal has been around for, well as long as we have. Funny how it takes a celebrity to make such an innocuous bone important or even famous. I have to admit, as a Chartered Physiotherapist or Physical Therapist, whichever you prefer, I doubted whether young Wayne would be fit in time for The World Cup. Fit he is though. So well done to Wqyne and to all his team.I know Wayne well, as I was his 'physio' at Everton. He is a precocious talent no doubt, strong as an ox, with an enormous will to win and a high pain threshold. If anyone was going to defy the odds it was him. A less strong attitude may not have won through. The oxygen therapy has likely had a major effect on maximising the healing time. These factors together with the fact that there have been no complications have seen Wayne return to match fitness in the shortest possible time.One thing is for sure though, Mother Nature will not be kidded. She will only heal at her own rate and makes exceptions for no one. Ask anyone who has suffered any kind of long term injury and been sidelined or unable to perform their normal activities of daily living. Frustration, sometimes of the highest order, is the word I think you may be looking for.Such situations demand patience. If it is not there, it will be taught. In my weird and wonderful career of treating and rehabilitating people through injury, I often come across the situation of The World's most impatient person being taught a lesson in sitting, waiting and thinking whilst an injury heals. Initially the intolerable discomfort of having to let 'important' stuff go undone is enough to send them into sheer apoplexy. This is closely followed by the 'this just cannot be, I'm just to busy for this to be happening to me' symptom. How so many of us think we are indispensible and almost above the laws of nature that govern everyone else. Cynic that I can be at times I often think that if you don't learn to slow down and live life at a pace acceptable to nature that she will have no alternative but to slow you down herself. Injury and sometimes severe injury or illness may be her way. Call me weird, but I have seen so many examples of this type of scenario.Just recently I have been reading a book about slowing down and changing how we think about time. At the same time as I have been reading Terry Waite's autobiography about his time as a hostage. Talk about learning to have patience and appreciating the little things in life. Funny also that at the time of reading these books I was fortunate enough to be relaxing at my Dad's villa in a totally magical part of Southern Spain where goat herding, fruit picking and riding on asses are still the norm. I had to smile as I engaged all of this around me and lapsed into this pace of life, lazing around the swimming pool yet still getting the urge to nip and check the mobile phone and e mail. Thankfully such urges died away naturally as the slow days meandered on.Anyone who has been to Africa will relate to being able to pick up the 'beat of life' that the continent has. It is magical and so powerful. This is what I am feferring to. This is not an article about selling up and going to live on a deserted island and giving up everything because you feel stressed, mmmmm but then again. It is just a faint reminder that in some way everyday a little gardening, time with your pet or children, a walk, a book, a day away or even a nap are enough to bring the beat of life to its healthier rhythm.Who said that we should be in this world but be not of it. I think may be they were saying the same thing. So take a minute, take a time out, call a valued friend, or just chill and meditate. It is injury prevention in its purest form. It could even save your life.

The Joint's A Rockin: Keeping Arthritis At Bay

The Joint

Sore, aching knees, hips, fingers, backrest. Pain after excessively much activity. Pain after overly little. Eventually, almost everyone gets degenerative arthritis. Sometimes it's the result of decades of wear-and-tear on the shock-absorbing cartilage that prevents bone from rubbing against bone. Sometimes it starts sooner, after an injury to the knees or other joints."By the age of 70, nearly everyone has degenerative joint disease, though not completely suffer the symptoms," says Roland Moskowitz, professor of medicine and director of the Northeast Ohio Multipurpose Arthritis Center at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland. Can eating certain foods cause--or aggravate--. At i time or another, soy, dairy products, potatoes, tomatoes, eggplant, and peppers rich person totally been implicated. Merely at that place's no goodness evidence that they, or any other foods, wealthy person anything to do with arthritis. Even so, if you think something you're eating is making your joints ache, cut it come out and understand if you tactile property bettor.Beyond food, "in that location ar steps that everybody tin return to try to prevent, or at least slow down feather, the onset and progression of ," says Moskowitz. Continued from page 1. The Subject Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (part of the Home(a) Institutes of Wellness) is funding 2 acupuncture trials, ane at the University of Maryland in Baltimore and the other at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. Both still recruiting patients, "so it's to a fault early to say if acupuncture works," says Moskowitz.Muscle is the just about important protector of joints," says Tufts University exercising expert Miriam Nelson. "Cartilage alone(p) absorbs shock that gets past tense the brawn. Without strong sinew, cartilage wears away much sooner." These II exercises, adapted from Nelson's "Strong Women and Men Beat Arthritis" (Penguin Putnam, 2002), tin can help strengthen the muscles in your lower berth binding, buttocks, and hamstrings. For the physical exertion that uses weights, exhale as you lift the weight and inhale as you frown it, even though that's the opposite of what almost multitude would do intuitively. Lie face pile with your forehead resting on the flooring, legs stretched book binding, toes pointing cover.

Cocaine Addiction Forms and Risks

Cocaine Addiction Forms and Risks

If you even suspect a loved one of cocaine addiction, it is better to take action and find out you were mistaken than not take action and find out they are addicted. The consequences can be very serious.So, how do you tell if a loved one is in the throes of cocaine addiction? There are many different ways of taking cocaine so the obvious symptoms differ. It can be snorted, ingested, smoked or injected.Snorting cocaine (also known as freebasing), for example, can lead to the loss of the sense of smell, nosebleeds, problems with swallowing, hoarseness and a chronically running nose. A sure sign is someone who is constantly sniffing. Snorting is a highly dangerous way of using it as the cocaine reaches the brain within seconds, resulting in an intense high but the euphoria quickly disappears, making the addict increase his use.Smoking cocaine is probably the worst cocaine addiction there is and is considered to be the most addictive. Signs of use, however, are not that evident other than increased jumpiness, irritability or even paranoia. Ingesting cocaine can cause severe bowel gangrene due to reduced blood flow. This is more difficult to tell but if a loved one suddenly starts having bowel movement problems, abdominal pain and nausea, consider cocaine addiction as a possibility.Those who inject cocaine can experience severe allergic reactions and, as with all drug users who inject themselves, they are at risk of contracting HIV and other blood-borne diseases. This is easier to detect than those ingesting it as there will probably be visible needle marks.Cocaine addiction leads to disturbances in the heart rhythm and can lead to heart attacks, chest pains and respiratory failure, strokes, seizures, headaches and gastrointestinal complications such as abdominal pain and nausea. Cocaine, having a tendency to decrease appetite, chronic users can become malnourished, which compounds the problem.Binging on cocaine can lead to increased irritability, restlessness and paranoia. Paranoia is a sure sign that the user is smoking or snorting. "Cocaine addiction" can even lead to full-blown paranoid psychosis. Whatever you do, don't let be put on anti-psychotics because you will be switching them from a cocaine addiction to an anti-psychotic addiction plus the possibility of reversion to the cocaine as well.Dealing with cocaine addiction is rather simple if you know what to do about it. The first thing is to get them onto a program that does not give them further drugs and can help them through withdrawal in the most effective and comfortable way using the correct vitamins and minerals that their already depleted body needs. There is a very specific method for handling cocaine addiction withdrawal that does not make them feel awful.Once they are through the withdrawal, a good program would consist of getting the drug residuals out of their body in the safest and most effective way.While they still have the drug residues in the body, they cannot think clearly and have low energy levels, making it impossible to grasp and understand the data they will need in the education part of the program.Only after they have gotten rid of the drug residues in their body on the detoxification step of the program are they ready to continue with the rest of the cocaine addiction rehabilitation program. The key things to look for in any cocaine addiction rehabilitation program is 1) comfortable, non-drug withdrawal, 2) a full detoxification program that rids their body of all the drug and toxic residues and 3) an educational aspect with the person being able to establish for himself why he became addicted in the first place and then working on the solution he has figured out from the education steps.

Expert Advice On Staying Healthy This Flu Season

Expert Advice On Staying Healthy This Flu Season

While fears about a bird flu pandemic have grown recently overseas, an increasing number of people right here at home are falling ill with this winter's seasonal flu bug. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), flu incidence has been on the rise since late December, spreading from the Southwest corner of the U.S. and making its way eastward. Seasonal flu affects up to 40 million Americans every year. Influenza and its complications are responsible for an average of 200,000 hospitalizations and 36,000 deaths annually in the U.S."Many Americans see flu as a nuisance rather than a serious health threat," said Donald Perlman, M.D., who specializes in treating respiratory illnesses at Newark Beth Israel Medical Center in New Jersey. "While concern about the avian flu is understandable, the health risks associated with seasonal flu are much higher for the average American than the bird flu threat." Despite the upswing in flu incidence, there are two fewer treatment options this season. The CDC has recommended against the use of amantadine and rimantadine for the prevention and treatment of influenza for the remainder of the 2005-2006 flu season due to increasing resistance levels. Instead, CDC recommends that oseltamivir (Tamiflu) and zanamivir (Relenza) be prescribed if an antiviral medication is needed.Dr. Perlman, an assistant clinical professor at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ), emphasizes that flu is a preventable disease, and offers advice and simple measures everyone can take to help control its spread:Prevention:• Get Vaccinated: Vaccine is the first line of defense. Visit www.cdc.gov for vaccine locations in your area. • Wash Hands Frequently: Germs are often spread when a person touches something contaminated followed by the eyes, nose or mouth. Wash hands often for 20 seconds with warm, soapy water. • Practice Respiratory Etiquette: Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing, to reduce the chances of spreading the virus to others.• Monitor Flu Outbreaks in Your Area: Stay informed of when the flu hits your city by logging on to www.flustar.com, which provides updates on flu outbreaks on a regional and nationwide basis. If You Get Sick:• Know the Difference Between Cold and Flu: Many people are confused by cold and flu symptoms. Above are some tips to help you tell the difference. • See Your Doctor at First Signs of Flu: Early diagnosis and treatment can help lessen the time you are sick, so see your doctor at the first sign of flu symptoms. He or she may prescribe an antiviral medication such as Tamiflu, which can reduce the duration and severity of flu symptoms if taken within 48 hours of symptom onset. Antiviral medications can also be used to help prevent the spread of flu within a household or workplace if taken within two days of exposure to the influenza virus. • Stay Home: Be considerate of others. If possible, stay home from work, school and errands when you are sick. As the threat of bird flu grows overseas, seasonal flu, which affects 40 million Americans each year, packs a punch in the U.S.

Intracerebral Hemorrhage: Bleeding Inside the Brain

All strokes damage the brain by disrupting circulation, but strokes come in multiple varieties. Because different parts of the brain are specialized to perform specific functions, symptoms produced by strokes vary according to what part of the brain was injured. In one patient the symptom might be weakness on one side of the body. In another it might be a partial loss of vision. In still another, a loss of speech. And symptoms can vary in intensity from mild to severe according to how large the area of damage is and whether it occurred in a pivotal location.Strokes can also vary according to another fundamental difference -- whether they involve a blocked blood vessel or a hemorrhage. Most strokes are due to the former in which brain-tissue damaged by lack of circulation is called an infarction. But 10-15% of strokes involve bleeding from ruptured blood vessels within the brain tissue, and while it's bad enough to have an infarction, hemorrhagic strokes (intracerebral hemorrhages) can be even more devastating. One prominent figure with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage is Ariel Sharon, whose hemorrhagic stroke occurred while he was still prime minister of Israel. Although some patients with intracerebral hemorrhage recover to a point of being able to enjoy other people and regain some independence in functioning, Sharon's poor clinical outcome is all too common in patients with this disease.The additional problem with hemorrhagic strokes is that the new deposit of blood occupies space -- sometimes a lot of it -- and there is only so much space within the skull (braincase) to go around. The fresh hemorrhage crowds and distorts the brain-tissue next to it, and additionally subjects the rest of the brain to increased pressure that can itself be damaging. Because of these distortions and pressure-changes, a patient with intracerebral hemorrhage often shows a decreased level of consciousness or even coma.Another kind of spontaneous bleed within the braincase is subarachnoid hemorrhage, often caused by ruptured aneurysms outside the brain but inside the braincase. While this, too, is a very serious condition, it is not the focus of this particular essay, and spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhages are not caused by aneurysms of this kind. Yet another kind of bleed that can be confused with (primary) intracerebral hemorrhage is secondary hemorrhage. This occurs in some patients who started out with infarctions of the brain but who had subsequent bleeding from fragile blood-vessels around the infarction's edges. This kind of bleed is not quite as serious as that which occurs when the bleed is primary (the initial event).How are intracerebral hemorrhages diagnosed? Since the 1970s when computed tomographic (CT) scans were introduced, this imaging technique has been the most effective and sensitive tool. A fresh hemorrhage within brain tissue is dramatically evident on CT scans. And unlike infarctions that can take a day or two to show up on CT scans, hemorrhages are already visible at the earliest moment a scan can be made.Although surgical removal of blood-clots from the surface of the brain -- called subdural and epidural hematomas -- can be life-saving and function-sparing, surgery for a bleed (hematoma or blood-clot) within the brain tissue itself is another story. Some studies comparing outcome between operated and unoperated patients with intracerebral hemorrhage showed improved outcome, on average, for operated patients, while still others showed worsened outcome. Operated or unoperated, patients had high rates of death and disability.Because of the limited prospects for meaningful improvement, surgery for intracerebral hemorrhage is often an act of desperation. One crusty old clinician was blunt about the direness of the situation, saying, "Show me a patient with intracerebral hemorrhage whose life was saved by surgery, and I'll show you a patient you wish you hadn't operated on." His point was that survivors of this operation usually show severe impairments.However, one form of hemorrhage within brain tissue is probably a special case, and that is hemorrhage within the cerebellum, located within the bony braincase just above the nape of the neck. Surgical extraction of blood clots occurring within the cerebellum prevents excessive pressure on the nearby brainstem that handles a lot of basic and necessary functions, like breathing.Administration of cortisol-type steroids is a nonsurgical treatment that has been studied in a scientific way, comparing treated patients to untreated patients with the same condition. The steroids didn't help. Decreasing the patients' blood pressures by administering medication has likewise been studied, but with the same outcome -- no benefit. However, in a preliminary study one nonsurgical treatment showed promise. Intravenous administration of activated factor VII (a natural component of the blood-clotting system) reduced expansion of the intracerebral blood-clot, death and disability when given within four hours of the initial hemorrhage. A larger study is underway to see if this benefit holds up under further analysis.Otherwise, what can be done acutely for this condition? Individualizing treatment seems rational, even if unproved. For example, if the patient had a bleed while taking a blood-thinner (as was the case with Ariel Sharon) then it makes sense to stop the blood-thinner or reverse its effects. Supportive management, like administering intravenous fluids to prevent dehydration, monitoring for irregular heartbeats and protecting the patient's airway also make sense. If the patient can't consume food in the usual way, feeding through tubes or intravenous lines can be considered, though this decision can be postponed until the patient's prospects are more apparent.Who is at risk for intracerebral hemorrhage? Neurologists at Malmo University Hospital in Malmo, Sweden, compared 147 patients with intracerebral hemorrhage with 1029 similar but stroke-free patients in order to determine risk factors. They found that hypertension (high blood pressure), diabetes, elevated triglyceride levels in the bloodstream, history of psychiatric problems, smoking and (surprisingly) short stature were more frequent in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. However, when it comes to modifiable risk-factors (those that one can do something about) a variety of studies indicate that hypertension is the single most important factor. Thus, treatment of hypertension, when present, is probably the single most effective thing that one can do in order to prevent this disease.(C) 2006 by Gary Cordingley

Sexual Health Information 101: STDs

As effective as modern contraception methods are, most protect you from only one kind of risk: unintended pregnancies. But, unplanned parenthood is not the only risk that comes with unsafe and unprotected sex. Practicing unsafe sex also puts you at risk of contacting sexually transmitted diseases and infections. Since condoms are the only known and proven birth control method that protect against STDs and STIs, a lot of sexual health information can go a long way in keeping yourself safe and uninfected. What are Sexually Transmitted Diseases?These are diseases and infections that can be contacted by means of having unsafe and unprotected sex with an infected partner. Contrary to popular belief, STDs are not only transmitted via vaginal sex. Anal, oral, and vaginal sex are potent means of transmitting these viruses and bacteria. Virus and bacteria that trigger these diseases and symptoms are transmitted through the bodily fluids exchanged during intercourse like saliva, vaginal fluids, and semen, among others. Sharing non-sterilized needles with other people is also a common cause of the spread of STDs. Blood is also a potent transmitter of these bacteria and viruses especially if it finds its way into open lesions or sores. What are the kinds of STDs?Generally, there are two kinds of STDs curable and non-treatable. Curable STDs, which are bacterial infections in nature, are often treated by using antibiotics and medication. Treatments are often long procedures which can take months or even years. It has also been observed that getting infected with STDs lowers one's defenses against future infections. Common examples of curable STDs include gonorrhea, chlamydia, syphillis, trichomoniasis, and vaginal infections. Non-treatable STDs are viral infections and diseases that progress over time and develop complications. While most are lifelong conditions, some can be fatal and cause death. Treatments and therapies are often administered not for the purpose of treating the infections but for minimizing the symptoms and fortifying the body's resistance against complications. Some of the known non-treatable STDs include genital herpes, Hepatitis B, genital warts, and the Human Immunodeficiency Virus or HIV. What are the symptoms of STDs?Symptoms of STDs may vary among individuals and the gravity of the infection. However, some of the common symptoms include: * foul penile discharge * burning pain while peeing * foul smell and changes in vaginal discharge * pain during sex and around the lower abdomen * blisters, sores, lesions, and rashes in the mouth, anus, or genital areas If one observes any, a combination, or all of the following symptoms, medical attention should be immediately sought. Key STD FactsAs a controversial subjects, there are lots of misconceptions and wrong ideas about STDs that can potentially cause more trouble. Below are some facts on STDs that can make detection and treatment easier: * A person can contact more than one STD at a time. An STD does not make a person immune from other sexually transmitted infections or from the same infection. In some cases, having STD can make a person more prone to contacting more infections or having a relapse. * STD does not discriminate. Sexually transmitted diseases can infect anyone from an adolescent to an aging drug dependent; all it takes is one unprotected indiscretion. * STDs are common. There are millions of people who are infected with STD or carry an infection strain. Most of these people are not even over the age of 30.

Summary

This article describes the lessons that exist in being injured or ill. It also talks about how we can go a long way towards injury and illness prevention just buy doing some simple and enjoyable activities everyday